Udall Genealogy

 

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David Udall's Journal

1851-1910

Transcription from microfilm of original by Garrett Pace, 2011.  Genealogical sections are grouped together at the end.

 

The first entry was dated 28 May 1851, while David and his family were living in St. Louis, Missouri.  He must have acquired the journal there.  The journal’s watermark is a mermaid on the waves, spear in hand and shield at her side, and the company name is “Dawton & Co.”.  It is about 6” by 12.5”.  The journal is old and worn, with a cardboard cover.  The cover long ago became detached from the pages, and was haphazardly sewn back into place with some fine string.

 

Bolded sections are later additions, not written in David’s original journal but included in Arizona Pioneer Mormon transcript or other family transcripts of the journal.

 

David Udall

Record Book

 

Preface, written 28 May 1851

The reason that I write this book is because the servant of God has advised me to do it and because I am determined that my posterity shall not be so ignorant about their forefathers as I am. Many a time have I wished to know about my forefathers but no one could tell me. How I wish they had kept a record book so that I might know something about them. I would have kept that book as sacred as I do the history of men that is recorded in the Bible. I have taken great pains in getting all the information about my relations and I wish my posterity--I know I shall have a posterity--to preserve this book and when it is old to copy it off on another and hand this record down from one generation to another so that none of my posterity may be ignorant about their genealogy. I wish each generation of my children to keep a record of their ups and downs that they have and the births and deaths, and a few of the most important things that come to pass in their lives, and hand it down to their children. Another request I have to make, that is to keep the commands of God and live soberly, honestly, industriously, and attend to every virtuous principle, and I promise you in the name of Jesus that you shall be blessed, both temporally and spiritually throughout time and eternity. Keep the commands of God and be His servants and keep in His Kingdom, and never enter into the kingdom of the devil.  Then we will all meet in the first resurrection together to receive the blessings that God has in store for us, to see all our good forefathers, to dwell on this earth when all is peace and happiness, when the knowledge of God will be over it.  Even so, Amen.  David Udall

 

 

History of David Udall

Born 18 Jan 1829 at Goudhurst, Kent, England.  The forepart of my life was spent with my mother and father on a farm called Hammond farm at Goudhurst.  I can remember my brother Jesse dying.  I was 3 years old.  At 6 years old I first went to a school.  When I first went to work daily with my father for 8 cents a day I was 9 years old.

Note: This paragraph written later in life, inserted into record before a series of blessing transcripts.

 

 

28 May 1851

History of David Udall

David Udall, the son of Jesse Udall, born in the parish of Goudhurst, county of Kent, England while his father was in America.  He was gone 13 months.  I was 6 months when he returned.  (David King Udall says of this incident that when Jesse Udall returned from America he was imprisoned for a short time for being in debt.  Such was the hard custom of those days.)  A strong healthy boy very dull sleepy he could not learn at school, he went to work with his father and earned his living and never was any expense to his parents after 9 years old.  He worked with his father two years and then went to Brighton in Sussex, 40 miles from his father’s house, stayed 10 months.  He got a good character and learned some good, some bad things.  (He worked as a baker’s boy delivering bread to the townspeople.)

Note: “dull sleepy he could not learn at school” has been scribbled over with pencil.

 

My father sent for me home and I have reasons to be thankful that I left those wicked men.  If I had stayed there I might now be going with the giddy multitude.  I became quick and thoughtful while at Brighton.  When I went to my father’s house I was quite altered; I could learn anything.  I went to work all the days and in the evening I learned to read and write and arithmetic, but I had a rebellious spirit my father had to correct me.

Note: “but I had a rebellious spirit my father had to correct me” has been scribbled over with pencil.

 

I lived with my father four years after I left Brighton.  I worked for many masters during the time, all gave me good character.  When I was about 13 years old I became a total abstainer from strong drink.  I did not drink anything that would intoxicate men or make them drunk.  I kept it for 10 years until I came to America.  During the time I labored hard and I declare with words of soberness that I was strong and healthy and could do any kind of labor without the assistance of strong drink.  Strong drink has been the downfall of thousands of young men.  It has robbed widows, starved children, made homes miserable and has been the stepping stone to all that bad.  I feel to advise all young men and women to totally abstain from strong drink.  It will keep them from the giddy multitude and do them good and be a blessing unto them, the same as it has been a blessing unto me.  I never have been drunk in my life.

 

When I was about fourteen years old I received religious impressions.  The Spirit of God convinced me of sin and of righteousness and that Jesus was the Son of God.  I was acquainted with the Wesleyans.  I did all that they told me, but I could not feel myself reconciled to God.  I could not feel my sins forgiven.  I prayed to God many times that I might feel at peace with Him and God heard my prayers – He brought me under the sound of the Gospel of Truth.

 

During the time I worked with my father he instilled into mind many good things, good principles, and he taught me to be sober, honest and industrious.  He set good examples; he was a total abstainer from strong drinks.  He was a good man.  I imitated his example and gained his approbation and the smile and affection of my mother.  They were very fond of me.  It’s a great blessing to have the smiles and prayers of your parents.  It’s a great blessing for children to have good parents.  I feel thankful to my Heavenly Father for giving me good parents and for sending me on this earth in this day and age of the world, and giving me health and strength and a good body and a portion of his Holy Spirit, and for giving me a sane mind, some wisdom and some knowledge, and for bringing under the sound of Gospel, and giving the spirit of obedience, and giving me a good wife, and giving me the means to go from my native land – a land of oppression and bondage – and bringing me to a land of freedom where the Kingdom of God will be built up.

 

When I was 16 years old I went to live at Marden, 5 miles from my father’s house.  My master kept a boarding school.  I served him 1 year.  I gained the approbation of my master and mistress and got good character.  Then I went to live at Putney 5 miles from London  and 50 miles from my father’s house.  I lived there 4 years and learned many things and gained much information, experience and wisdom.

 

I attended a “milk walk” for my cousin for 4 years.  I kept myself sober, honest and industrious and gained the approbation of my cousin.  He never found me out in a dishonest action in all the time I was about among a good many men and women.  I kept good company and I gained the approbation of all around me.  After I had lived at Putney 1 year and a quarter I fell in love with my wife.  The first time I saw her was 7 Feb 1848.  She gained my approbation.  I kept faithful to her for 2 years and then we were married.  I never saw a young woman I liked so much.  I have proved her to be a good young woman, a good wife and a good saint.  I can say of a truth I never deceived any young woman nor never robbed any young woman of her virtue.  I feel thankful to God for it and I say unto everyone that reads this writing: be faithful and kind to the female sex, perform your promises and never deceive them, and it will be a blessing unto you, and if you do not it will prove a curse to you.

 

Eliza King (my wife), the daughter of William and Ann Anderson King, was born December 30, 1826 at Waltham Parish, Berks, England.  The greater portion of her girlhood life was spent in working as a cook, waiting maid, etc.  Her father was a farm laborer and she had six brothers and five sisters.  They were identified with the Protestant Churches and were devout Christians.  She was above medium height and weight, having dark brown hair which was silken and wavy' full dark eyes, beautiful complexion and red cheeks, and was pronounced by her neighbors as a beautiful woman.

 

When I lived at Putney about the year 1847, I became acquainted with a Mormon Elder by the name of John Squires.  He was a good servant of God.  I feel thankful to him for his kindness and his instruction, and I feel thankful to God for bringing me under the sound of the voice of one of his servants, and for giving me the spirit of obedience.  Mr. Squires preached the gospel to me faithfully.  I received it and was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 15 Jun 1848, and ordained a Teacher 15 Jul 1849 and a Priest on 26 Oct 1849.  Eliza King baptized 6 Nov 1848.

 

I was the first one that obeyed the voice of the servants of God in that region of country that I lived in.  I kept the faith, I preached the Gospel to the people at Richmond, at Hammersmith and at Battersea.

 

In the 22nd year of my age, 2 Dec 1850, I was married to Eliza King for time at Hammersmith near London.  We had a happy wedding. We went from Hammersmith to my wife’s father’s and mother’s house at Binfield in Berkshire.  We spent a happy 14 days with them, then went to London 35 miles, stayed one night.  Then we went to see our relations at Chatham in the County of Kent, stayed two nights.  We went all over Chatham, we saw the barracks, the docks and the fortifications.  We have traveled over London and a great part of England and have seen many of the wonderful sights many many beautiful things we have seen.

 

When we left Chatham we went to my father’s house and spent a happy 14 days with them.  My father and mother were very fond of me and my wife.  They mourned very much when we left them to go to America.  I was sorry to go and leave them.  I would like to have stayed and supported them when old but I could not – I did not want to stay in a land of oppression and have a family and bring them up in poverty.  I felt like obeying the commands of the Lord – he had commanded me through his servants to flee to the land of Zion where I might learn wisdom and grow in knowledge and be blessed and be a blessing to my posterity.

 

On 2 Jan 1851 we set out from my father’s for America.  We went to London, stayed with our relations 3 days.  From there we went to Liverpool 200 miles.  We got into a Mormon ship.  We had to wait in the Mersey River 14 days for the wind.  We left there on the 20th.  We were in the Irish channel 9 days with a rough headwind.  We were tossed about in a wonderful manner, all the people sick.  I was seasick two days and two nights, could not eat anything.  I shall never forget it.  We could not sleep; we had to hold ourselves in bed and there was an awful noise with the boxes rolling about and the chains and the sailors and the captain.  My wife was sick all the time, could not eat and became so emaciated that in washing her hands her wedding ring came off and was thrown into the sea.  (David King Udall says that his mother became so emaciated that in washing her hands her wedding ring came off and washed into the sea.)  We were 3 weeks going from Liverpool to New Orleans, we stayed at New Orleans 2 days, 6000 miles from Liverpool, then we got in a steamboat and went to St. Louis 1200 miles from New Orleans.  We were 7 days.  When we got to St. Louis my wife got better.

 

I got work in a brickyard.  I was very fortunate; many of the Saints could not get work.  Many of them were sick and in poverty and many of them died with cholera.  I worked in the brickyard 5 months, then went to work helping to build a large chimney 150 feet high on 14 Street Shoothers.

 

My sister Ann died 21 Jun 1851 at Westfield, Chataqua county, state of New York, America.  She was a good young woman, she lived up to the light that God gave her and I believe she will rise in the first resurrection.

 

I was called to the office of an elder and to preside over the first ward in St. Louis on 16 Aug 1851.

Note: “Second ward” written and scratched out.

 

Note: Though written in the style of a daily journal, this section was actually written later, probably all at once, as it references later events and is very uniform in style and manner.  Either it is a reminiscence or a transcription of another record with parentheticals thrown in.

 

7 Sep 1851

David King Udall was born, the first son of David and Eliza Udall, at St. Louis, Missouri, North America, near the city hospital.

 

27 Apr 1852

Myself and family left St. Louis for Salt Lake Valley, California.  (With an independent company of pioneers.)  I am thankful to God my father for delivering us from St. Louis.  It is a sickly, wicked hell of a place.  Many of my brethren have fell but I have been preserved.  We left, 6 of us and my child in one wagon, 2 yoke oxen.  The other members of the party were Brother and Sister Jeffs, Brother Clegg, an old bachelor and his sister.  We camped at Manchester.

 

29 Apr 1852

Camped at Union

 

2 May 1852

We had a very heavy thunderstorm and bought 2 cows.

 

16 May 1852

We ferried the Osage River – that was the greatest hell that ever I was in.  It was on a Sunday, we had a heavy thunderstorm and flooded our wagons.  Two of the brethren got fighting and when our wagons were on the ferry boat one of the oxen got overboard.  We got him on again and then one of the oxen gave me a kick overboard and Brother Vickers pulled me out of the water by my feet.  I shall always remember it and thank God for saving my life.  We passed through a half mile of swamp land up to our knees in water and we came to good country, plenty of grass, good roads, some strawberries.

 

1 Jun 1852

We got to Independence safe after having our wagons break down and a great many more difficulties.

 

6 Jun 1852

Camped at Kansas City and crossed the Kansas River.

 

8 Jun 1852

Came to Fort Leavenworth.

 

9 Jun 1852

We for the plains, 7 or 8 wagons, 11 men.

 

11 Jun 1852

We found an ox with a yoke on.  He was very wild.  We got a rope on him and he ran at us and drove us.  We took him to Salt Lake and sold him and divided the money.

 

12 Jun 1852

We lost all our oxen.  We found some of them 7 miles off.

 

14 Jun 1852

Found many dead oxen and graves of men.

 

24 Jun 1852

We came to the Big Blue and forded it.

 

30 Jun 1852

Came to the Platt River.  The mosquitoes troubled us very much.  Brother Vickers’ child died the day before.

 

1 Jul 1852

We came to Fort Kearney.

 

3 Jul 1852

We came to a flock of sheep, 10,000 in number going to California.  15 or 20 of them were left behind every day.

 

12 Jul 1852

We forded the south fork of the Platt River.

 

13 Jul 1852

Came to Oak Hollow.

 

16 Jul 1852

Came to Chimney Rock.

 

20 Jul 1852

Came to Fort Laramie.  We that had money bought provisions.  Some had no money or provisions.  They laid their case before the commander of the fort and he gave them freely and liberally, so we started, refreshed again.

 

4 Aug 1852

We forded the north fork of the Platt River.  We had some trouble getting through, and then we saw a widow’s wagon turned over in the river.  We saved most of the things.  There was some man found who had been drowned.

 

10 Aug 1852

We forded the Sweetwater River at Independence Rock.

 

23 Aug 1852

Come to Sulphur and Tar Springs.

 

3 Sep 1852

We arrived at Salt Lake City.  I was very sick for a week.  I was very thankful when I recovered.  My wife and I were rebaptized on 19 Sep 1852 and had all former blessings and the Priesthood conferred on us.

 

20 Sep 1852

We started for Nephi.

 

21 Sep 1852

Camped on the hot springs, the first that ever I saw

 

24 Sep 1852

We arrived at Nephi and were welcomed by the president of the city and on the 25th we were invited to a good dinner.  Been festival day (first anniversary of the settlement of Nephi).  I like this place very much.  I feel at home here and I feel to record my thanks to my God my Father in Heaven for his mercy, and blessing to me for sending me on the earth in this age of the world, for health, for strength, for bringing me under the sound of the gospel, and his spirit to guide me, and for bringing me through all the dangers that I passed through, and for bringing me to this place, and I ask him in the name of Jesus to bless me and my posterity after me according to his wisdom.

 

16 & 17 Jul 1853

A war broke out with the Indians today.  They shot a man dead.  We all had to move out of our houses, into the fort that we made with our wagons.

 

22 Jul 1853

My wife and I were married and sealed together for time and for all eternity by George A. Smith, one of the Quorum of the Twelve.

 

26 Jul 1853

Daybreak in the morning I was shot through the calf of the leg by an Indian while I was standing on guard.  Another man was with me but we could not see him.  I thank my Heavenly Father for preserving my life from that Lamanite or Indian.

 

30 Jul 1853

The Indians stole 200 head of cattle and horses from Aldridge settlement, all they had except 2 horses.  They took them in the daytime while the men were herding them.

 

21 Aug 1853

I was rebaptized for the remission of my sins.

 

23 Aug Sep 1853

William Jesse Udall was born died 8 Sep 1853.  At the same time we saw a comet in the west with a tail upwards about as long as a sword, it looked to be.

Note:  The comet was Comet Klinkerfues, which was visible in the night sky from August to October.  The date of the entry, and William’s death date are confused.  The entry appears to say that William was born 23 Aug 1853, but the word “September” is written above the date.  Equally possible that William was born and died (possibly the same day) and the entry was made on 23 Sep 1853.  Temple records in 1880 give birthdate of 23 Aug 1853.

 

1 Oct 1853

Four of our brethren were killed by the Indians on the divide at William Springs 14 miles from here.  They were brought here the same day and buried the next morning.  We were ordered by the officers to kill the Indians.  We killed 8 of them, took a boy and a squaw prisoners.  I did not kill any of them.  I took one of them prisoners and another man came and shot him.

 

20 Nov 1853

Captain Gunnison and 7 of his men were killed by the Indians on the Sevier River.  They were surveying for a railroad.

 

1 Dec 1853

We felt the shock of an earthquake.  The people ran out of their houses, and on the 12th we felt another here.  Shock in the night, it woke the people.

 

 

My mother died 30 Oct 1854; the grasshoppers destroyed nearly all my crops.

 

20 Jun 1855

Eliza Ann Udall born.

 

1 Nov 1855

David and Eliza Udall received endowments.

 

6 Jan 1857

My wife miscarried a child and was very sickly.  Elizabeth Rowley rebaptized 21 Mar 1857.  David Udall and Elizabeth Rowley were sealed for time and all eternity by Brigham Young 5 Apr 1857.  I was ordained a Seventy and admitted into the 49th Quorum of Seventy by the presidents thereof 18 May 1857

 

10 Oct 1857

I was called to go out and meet our enemies. (Johnson’s Army)

 

10 Dec 1857

My daughter Mary Ann was born and I blessed her when 8 days old.

 

June 23, 1861

My son Joseph was born.

 

15 Mar 1863

My wife Eliza died.  She lived the life of a saint, true to all her covenants.  She loved me as her husband and was passionately fond of her children.  She was a good wife and companion and a good mother.  She left four children.  She was pregnant when she died.  I am very sorry to lose her, but the Lord’s will be done.

Note: “and her children” written between “her” and “children”

 

2 Jul 1864

Rebecca May was sealed to David Udall.  In January of this year I was thrown from a horse and very much hurt, which I feel every day of my life.

 

1870

I was called by Brigham Young to go to Kanab to help build up a city.  I arrived there 7 Dec 1870.  After I had been there a few days Brother Levi Stewart’s house caught fire and burnt to death 5 sons and his wife, which was the awfullest sight I have ever seen.

 

 

13 Dec 1871

George Albert born at 6 AM.  The grasshoppers destroyed our crops in the year of 1867, 1868 and 1871, but I thank the Lord.  He has sustained us all the days of our life.

 

1872

I built a rock house at Kanab.

 

16 Oct 1872

I started from Salt Creek (Nephi) with Elizabeth, my second wife, and her children.  Arrived at Kanab, October 30, 1872.

 

1873

This year I lived at Kanab.  It was an exceedingly dry summer and I lost nearly all my crop for the want of water.  Emma Keturah born 1 Aug, 7 o’clock in the morning.

 

1874.  In the month of April I entered into the United Order with all that I had.  I worked in the Order eight months and then they gave me all back again.  It gave me great experience and I believe the United Order is from Heaven.

 

1875

I left Kanab with my family May 12 and arrived at Nephi on the 27th.  I traded my house and lot and farming at Kanab to my son David.  I with my family was rebaptized in the United Order in October 1875 by Bishop Joel Glover (Nephi).

Note: “Traded” is written above “gave”, which is in-line and not crossed out.

 

1879

The driest year I ever saw, very short crops.  I went to the St. George Temple and did a work for the dead in January 1880.

 

23 Nov 1882

Alvin Jewell Udall born 23 Nov 1882, blessed 11 days old by his father.

 

28 Jan 1883

David Udall ordained a High Priest and set apart as a bishop to act in the Second Ward Nephi Branch.  Joseph F. Smith was mouth.

 

22 Nov 1883

George Albert Udall ordained a Deacon by David Udall.

 

20 Dec 1889

George Albert Udall ordained a Priest by Wm. Paxman.

 

1888

David Udall stood trial for cohabitation and the jury acquitted him and brought in a verdict of not guilty.

Note: Entry for 1889 appears above 1888 on the page.

 

1889

Our crops nearly a failure because of drought and grasshoppers.

 

5 Mar 1890

Edwin Udall died.  Died in the faith after filling his mission on the earth.

 

18 Jan 1891

David Udall ordained a Patriarch by Apostles F. M. Lyman and John Henry Smith. 

 

1891

Raised good crops, about 1500 bushels grain and 50 tons hay.  Gave 75 patriarchal blessings and worked in the temple for my parents, Jesse and Ann Drawbridge Udall, for my son, Edwin Udall and many others of our dead relations.

Note: “John Henry Smith” crossed out.

 

1892

My dear daughter Louisa Ostler died.  She was a good woman, she left 2 children as son and daughter.  We did work for her in the House of the Lord

 

1893

The blessing of the Lord was on us all.  We had good health, good crops and did some work in the House of the Lord for the dead.

 

1894

I started for England June 14 and returned August 25th.  The Lord blessed me on that genealogy mission.  I visited many relations and friends.  They all received me kindly.  I saw the graves of many relations and friends and I got the genealogy of many with the intention of working for them in the Temples of the Lord.  We raised middling crops of grain but lost our crop of beets because they could not make sugar from them.

 

1895

This year the Lord prospered us, all my family with health, happiness, peace and prosperity in crops, and yet we could hardly pay our crop taxes and other debts, for everything was so cheap.  But we are thankful it is as well with us as it is.  We start to the Temple to work for the dead January 1896.

 

1896

This year the Lord has blessed our labors.  We raised a good crop.  Peace and prosperity attended our labors and we worked for our dead in the Temple of our God at Manti.

 

1897

We have been prospered with a middling crop, and we have had health and happiness in our family, and we did some work in the Manti Temple for our dead.

 

1898

We raised a middling crop and worked in the Manti Temple for our dead relations and friends.

 

1899

We raised good crop of grain and hay and worked for our dead friends and relations and attended to our religious duties to a good extent and we thank the Lord for his loving kindness and his mercies toward us.

 

1900

We raised a small crop this year because of the grasshoppers, and we had to borrow money to pay our taxes, yet we made a living and did some work in the temple.  We thank the Lord for the blessing of working for our dead.  This year we had two old horses die, 25 years old.

 

1901

Very poor crop this year in consequence of the grasshoppers and the dry season.  We had to borrow money to pay our taxes.  We worked in the temple again for our dead, and we rejoice in the good work.

 

1902

A very dry season and some grasshoppers, our crop was very small and our beet crop was a failure.  They did not pay expenses.  We lost 4 of our good horses.  We worked in the temple again, and we give God the thanks for the blessing he gives us in working for the salvation of the dead.

 

1903

This was a very dry summer, we had a failure in our grain crop and in our beets.  We proved we could not raise beets in Nephi field to make it pay.  We worked in the temple of the Lord for our dead relations and friends.  We rejoiced and thanked the Lord for this privilege.  We had peace and happiness at home.

 

1904

Rebecca and David Udall spent two months in Arizona with our children and grandchildren, all that time rejoicing with them and thanking the Lord that we had that privilege.  On 18 Jan we had a birthday party and dinner at my son David King’s house.  We had music, singing and speaking of the best kind.  Ida Hunt Udall sang “Grandpa’s Birthday Song” composed by herself, and on that 75th birthday of mine we had a glorious time of rejoicing with our children, grandchildren and great-grandchild.  Never to be forgotten.

 

1905

Very dry summer, lost much of our crop.  Worked in the temple for our dead relations and friends.  We are very thankful to our Heavenly Father for this privilege.

 

1906

We sold some of our property and got out of debt through the help of Rebecca Udall.  We thank the Lord that he gave her the power to save up that money so that we became clear of debt.

 

1907

My dear beloved wife Elizabeth died 24 Jun 1907 at Nephi, which was a great grief to me.  I thank the Lord for giving me such a good faithful wife and a good loving mother to her children and to all around her.

 

1908

We raised a good crop of grain, no fruit – the frost took it nearly all.  Worked for our dead in the Manti Temple and are very thankful to our Heavenly Father for that favor.  My daughters Eliza Ann Tenney and Mary Ann Stewart helped me very much.

 

1909

We went to the Manti Temple and worked for our dead.  My daughter Kate U. Bailey and her husband William Bailey helped me very much.  We lost our fruit crop by the frost.  We raised a good crop of grain.  I rented my farm to my son Alvin Udall.  My wife Rebecca and myself were taken very sick with La Gripe.  We thank the Lord for our recovery.

 

1910

Rebecca’s health is very poor.  Her eyesight is nearly gone.  Her memory is poor.  On 10 Jun my daughter Eliza Ann Tenney and sisters Mary Stewart and Kate Bailey and William Bailey went to the Manti Temple and did a good work for our dead.  The frost took all our fruit this year.  This is a very dry season.  Our crops are middling.

 

 


Events and Genealogies

 

Genealogy

Udall Family

John Udall born 1748, Catherine his wife, her maiden name King who died 1829.  The grandfather and grandmother of David Udall; good merit, noble spirited man and woman, lived industriously, brought up a large family respectably.  When John Udall died he left his family 1000 pounds, but they were wasteful and made off with it, brought themselves to poverty and their mother died insane.  John Udall brought up his family in the parish of Goudhurst, county of Kent, but where he was born I could never find out, and I never saw a man in my life by the name of Udall, only our family.

 

They were the father and mother of:

John born about 1776

William 1780

George 13 May 1782

Gaius 1785

Jesse 11 Oct 1788

Sarah, Mary and Keturah (who died Aug 1849)

David died 29 Oct 1796

 

When I left England there was only Jesse my father and George alive.

 

Drawbridge Family

My grandfather born 1749, grandmother 1759.  Good moral man and woman.  I always think about them with respect.  Brought up a large family by industry as a blacksmith.  Lived in the parish of Cranbrook, Kent.

 

Children:

Elizabeth born 4 Aug 1779

John 1781 died 19 Dec 1831, his wife born 17 Sep 1788, good woman

Thomas 10 Jan 1784

Maria 20 May 1782

Samuel 15 Mar 1786

William 19 Apr 1789

Ann mother of David Udall born 18 Apr 1791

Sarah 2 Aug 1793

Catherine 5 May 1801

George 4 Oct 1802

Benjamin 10 Jul 1795

Ann Drawbridge Udall, mother of David Udall died 30 Oct 1854

 

Jesse Udall Family

Jesse Udall was the son of John Udall and the father of David Udall, born 11 Oct 1788, lived by his industry and brought up a large family in the way they should go.  He taught them to be sober, industrious, honest and many other good principles and set them good examples.  He came to America and his son David was born to him in the parish of Goudhurst.

 

Ann Drawbridge born 18 Apr 1791, a good woman, had 16 children, she loved her son David very much.  She became the wife of William Boys and bore him 7 children, two lived:

 

Louisa, born 15 Oct 1811 died 1840, left 4 children

William, born 26 Feb 1816

 

Ann Boys then became the wife of Jesse Udall, bore him 9 children.  She was a good wife and mother. 

 

Children:

Jesse the eldest son born 24 Dec 1818, died 8 May 1833

John and Benjamin born 18 Jul 1822, Benjamin died 3 or 4 months old, John had 4 daughters by 1850

Ann born 25 Dec 1825

Keturah 6 Apr 1827

David 18 Jan 1829

George King Udall 27 May 1831, died 21 Jan 1908

Youngest son Jesse born 22 Apr 1835, died 6 Mar 1844

Mary 2 Apr 1836, died 1860

 

William King Family

William King born 23 May 1788, Ann Anderson the wife of Wm King born 24 Dec 1798, the father and mother of Eliza King, the wife of David Udall, live in the parish of Binfield, Berkshire, England.  A very good man and woman, brought up a large family by industry.  They are good, honest, sober, industrious.

 

Affectionate children:

Oldest daughter Maria born 28 Jul 1817

Charles 17 Sep 1818 died 1900

Elizabeth 1820 died 1822

Sarah 22 Apr 1822

John and Ann 15 Jul 1824

Eliza 30 Dec 1826

William 18 Feb 1829

Emma 8 Apr 1831

George 13 Apr 1833 died

Joseph 13 Jul 1835

Mary 6 Jul 1837

Henry 10 May 1840

 

 

25 Jun 1870

David Udall was baptized for the dead

Grandfather        John Udall born 1741, England

Father                 Jesse Udall born 11 Oct 1788, Goudhurst, England

Uncle                  George Udall born 13 May 1782, Goudhurst, England

Grandfather        John Drawbridge born 1749, Cranbrook, England

Uncle                  John Drawbridge born 10 May 1781, Cranbrook, England

Uncle                  Samuel Drawbridge born 15 Mar 1786, Cranbrook, England

Uncle                  William Drawbridge born 17 Apr 1789, Cranbrook, England

Uncle                  Thomas Drawbridge born 10 Jan 1784, Cranbrook, England

Uncle                  George Drawbridge born 4 Oct 1802, Cranbrook, England

Brother               William Boys born 22 Feb 1816, Cranbrook, England

Brother               Jesse Udall born 24 Dec 1818, Goudhurst, Kent, England

Youngest Brother             Jesse Udall born 22 Apr 1833

 

Eliza Ann Udall was baptized for the following names:

Grandmother      Elizabeth King, wife of John Udall ___ April

_____                 Keturah Udall

Great Grandmother Drawbridge      born 1759

Great Aunt         Elizabeth Drawbridge born 21 Aug 1779, England

Great Aunt         Maria Drawbridge born 20 May 1798, England

Great Aunt         Sariah Drawbridge born 23 Aug 1793, England

Great Aunt         Catharine Drawbridge born 5 May 1801, England

Aunt                   Louisa Boys born 15 Oct 1811

___                      Ann Udall born 25 Dec 1825

___                      Mary Udall born 2 Apr 1836

Great Grandmother Ann Anderson wife of William King

 

 

David Udall Family Record

Note: Comprised of two sections, written in two different places in his journal.

 

Section 1

David Udall Son of Jesse, Ann Udall

Born 13 Jan 1829 at Goudhurst, Kent, England

Baptized 15 Jun 1848 by Elder Squires at Putney, Surrey, England in the River Thams

Ordained Teacher 15 Jul 1849 by Elder Jarvis, presid.

Ordained Priest 23 Oct 1849 by Elder Jarvis

Ordained Elder 16 Aug 1851 at St. Louis, America by Elder Wrigley, President of the Conference

Ordained a Bishop and High Priest 28 Jan 1883

Ordained a Seventy and admitted into the 49th Quorum of the Seventy by the Presidents Ahierosff 18 May 1851

Note: Number scratched out and 1851 written below.  The office of Seventy was made a stake calling in 1883.  He was probably ordained in 1883, particularly since the record is between two 1883 events.

 

George Albert Udall

Ordained Deacon 23 Nov 1883 By David Udall

Ordained Priest 26 Dec 1889 by Wm. Paxman

Ordained Patriarch 18 Jan 1891 by Apostles Francis M. Lyman and Smith

Note: “And Smith” scratched out.  Smith would have been John Henry Smith or perhaps Joseph F. Smith.

 

Alvin Udall ordained Deacon 2 Dec 1893 by Bp. Parks, J. D. Pexton ___

George Albert Udall ordained an Elder 6 Jan 1874 by William Paxman, Charles Sperry, and James Paxman

 

 

Section 2

David son of Jesse Udall, born 18 Jan 1829.

Eliza King Udall, daughter of William King, born 30 Dec 1826.  Married to David Udall 2 Dec 1850 at Hammersmith, London, England.  Died 15 Mar 1863.

 

David K. Udall born 7 Sep 1851, 6 in the morning.

William Jesse Udall born 23 Aug 1853 at Nephi.  Died 8 Sep 1853.

Eliza Ann Udall born 20 Jun 1855 at Nephi.

Mary Ann Udall born 10 Dec 1857 at Nephi.

Charles Udall born 6 Dec 1859 at Nephi, died 5 Jan 1860.

Joseph Udall born 23 Jun 1861

 

Eliza King Udall died 15 Mar 1863 at Nephi.

 

Elizabeth Rowley, daughter of William Rowley, born 14 Dec 1838.  Married to David Udall 5 Apr 1857, died 24 Jun 1907.

 

William David Udall born 27 Nov 1858 at Nephi.

Emily Udall born 14 Jan 1860 at Nephi, died 3 Mar 1869.

Elizabeth Ann Udall born 18 Nov 1861 at Nephi.

Sarah Jane Udall born 15 Oct 1863 at Nephi.

Edwin Udall born 12 Aug 1865 at Nephi.

Louisa Udall born 3 Jun 1867 at Nephi, died 15 Mar 1890.

Alice Udall born 14 Mar 1869 at Nephi.

George Albert Udall born 13 Feb 1871 at Nephi.

Emma Keturah Udall born 1 Aug 1873 at Kanab, died 8 Oct 1874 and buried at Kanab.

Willie Udall born 12 Feb 1875 at Kanab, died 31 Jan 1880 and buried at Nephi.

Kate Eveline Udall born 26 Mar 1879 at Nephi.

Alvin Jewell Udall born 23 Nov 1882 at Nephi.

 

Edwin Udall died 15 Mar 1890.

 

David Udall ordained Patriarch 18 Jan 1891 by Apostles F. M. Lyman and John H. Smith.

 

Rebecca May Seal and David 2 Jul 1862, Eliza Rebecca born 1840, Liverpool, England

 

Louisa Udall Ostler died 10 May 1892, 8 o’clock A.M.

 

 


 

 

 

 

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